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Treating Moles: What You Need to Know

Published:
February 28, 2024
Author:
Piction Health

Moles are a common skin condition that many people experience at some point in their life. While usually harmless, some moles can be problematic and require medical intervention. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about treating moles, including understanding what they are, when to seek medical advice, diagnosing moles, and available treatment options.

Understanding Moles

What are Moles?

A mole is a growth on the skin that is usually brown or black in color and can appear anywhere on the body. They typically appear during childhood or adolescence and can increase in size as a person ages. Most moles are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. However, in some cases, they can develop into melanoma, a dangerous form of skin cancer.

It is important to keep an eye on your moles and report any changes to your doctor. Changes in size, shape, color, or texture can be warning signs of melanoma. Other warning signs include moles that bleed, itch, or become painful.

Causes of Moles

The exact cause of moles is unknown, but they are believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. People with fair skin, light hair, and eyes are more likely to develop moles than those with darker skin tones. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun or tanning beds can also increase the risk of developing moles.

UV light can cause damage to the DNA in skin cells, which can lead to the development of moles and other types of skin growths. It is important to protect your skin from UV damage by wearing protective clothing, using sunscreen, and avoiding tanning beds.

Types of Moles

There are several types of moles, including common moles, atypical moles, and congenital moles. Common moles are usually round or oval, have a smooth, even color, and are less than 6mm in size. Atypical moles are larger, have an irregular shape, and can vary in color. Congenital moles are present at birth and can be very large and irregular.

While most moles are harmless, it is important to have any new or changing moles checked by a dermatologist. Early detection and treatment of melanoma can greatly improve the chances of a successful outcome.

It is also important to perform regular self-examinations of your skin to check for any new or changing moles. Look for moles that are asymmetrical, have an irregular border, are more than one color, have a diameter larger than a pencil eraser, or are evolving in size, shape, or color.

Remember, prevention and early detection are key when it comes to skin cancer. Protect your skin from UV damage and report any changes to your doctor right away.

When to Seek Medical Advice

When it comes to our health, it's always better to be safe than sorry. This is especially true when it comes to moles. Moles are a common occurrence on our skin, and while most are harmless, it's essential to keep an eye on them and seek medical advice if you notice any changes.

Many people wonder what changes in a mole are concerning and warrant a trip to the doctor. Signs of a problematic mole include asymmetry, where one half of the mole does not match the other half, irregular borders, where the edges of the mole are not smooth, uneven color, where the mole has multiple shades or colors, diameter larger than 6mm, and evolving, where the mole changes in size, shape, or color over time.

If you notice any of these changes in your moles, it's important to seek medical advice as soon as possible. Your doctor will be able to examine the mole and determine if it's benign or if further testing is needed.

Signs of a Problematic Mole

Let's take a closer look at the signs of a problematic mole. Asymmetry is a significant red flag because most moles are symmetrical. If one half of the mole is different from the other half, it may be a sign of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

Irregular borders are another sign of a problematic mole. Benign moles typically have smooth, even borders. If the mole's edges are jagged or irregular, it may be a sign of melanoma.

Uneven color is another red flag. Benign moles typically have a uniform color, while melanomas may have multiple shades or colors. If you notice a mole with different shades of brown, black, or even red, it's important to seek medical advice.

Diameter larger than 6mm is another sign of a problematic mole. Benign moles are typically smaller than a pencil eraser, while melanomas are usually larger than 6mm. If you notice a mole that's larger than 6mm, it's important to have it checked out by a dermatologist.

Evolving moles are also a cause for concern. If you notice a mole that's changing in size, shape, or color over time, it's important to seek medical advice. Your doctor will be able to determine if the changes are benign or if further testing is needed.

Risk Factors for Skin Cancer

While most moles are benign, there is a risk that they can develop into skin cancer. It's important to be aware of the risk factors for skin cancer and take steps to protect yourself.

Having many moles is a risk factor for skin cancer. The more moles you have, the higher your risk of developing melanoma. If you have many moles, it's important to keep a close eye on them and seek medical advice if you notice any changes.

Having a family history of skin cancer is another risk factor. If someone in your family has had skin cancer, you may be at a higher risk of developing it yourself.

Excessive sun and UV exposure are also risk factors for skin cancer. If you spend a lot of time in the sun or use tanning beds, you may be at a higher risk of developing skin cancer. It's important to protect your skin by wearing sunscreen, protective clothing, and seeking shade when possible.

Fair skin, hair, and eyes is another risk factor. If you have fair skin, hair, and eyes, you may be at a higher risk of developing skin cancer. It's important to take extra precautions to protect your skin if you have fair features.

Finally, a weakened immune system is a risk factor for skin cancer. If you have a weakened immune system due to a medical condition or medication, you may be at a higher risk of developing skin cancer. It's important to discuss your risk factors with your doctor and take steps to protect your skin.

Diagnosing Moles

Visual Examination

In most cases, a visual examination will be enough to determine whether a mole is benign or problematic. During an examination, your doctor will assess the mole's size, shape, color, and any changes that may have occurred over time.

Dermoscopy

If your doctor believes that a mole is problematic, they may perform a dermoscopy. This is a non-invasive procedure where a dermatologist will use a special tool called a dermoscope to examine the mole's structure and determine if it is cancerous.

Skin Biopsy

If a mole appears suspicious, a skin biopsy may be performed to confirm whether it is cancerous. During a biopsy, a small piece of the mole is removed and sent to a laboratory for analysis.

Treatment Options for Moles

Monitoring and Observation

In most cases, benign moles do not require treatment and can be monitored to ensure they do not become problematic. Your doctor may recommend:

  • Regular skin exams to monitor the mole
  • Self-examinations to check for any changes
  • Avoiding sun exposure or using sun protection to reduce the risk of additional moles developing

Surgical Removal

If your doctor believes that a mole is problematic, it may need to be surgically removed. A surgical removal can be done under local anesthesia and is a relatively simple procedure. After the mole is removed, it will be examined in a laboratory to determine if it is cancerous.

Laser Treatment

Laser treatment is another option for removing moles. A laser is used to break down the mole's pigment, causing it to fade. This treatment is generally reserved for smaller moles and may require several sessions to achieve the desired results.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy involves freezing the mole off using liquid nitrogen. This treatment is generally reserved for shallow moles and is not suitable for larger or deeper moles.

Conclusion

Overall, most moles are harmless and do not require treatment. However, it is still important to keep an eye on your moles and seek medical advice if you notice any changes. By understanding what to look for and how to treat problematic moles, you can ensure your skin stays healthy and cancer-free.